O-Xchange Notes from the Field!

Thursday, April 23, 2009

Set OWA as your default email client

use this tool: messageware activesend(www.messageware.com) to use OWA2007 or OWA2003 as the default email client
 
Messageware ActiveSend Personal makes it simple to e-mail Microsoft Office documents with a single click using your corporate Outlook Web Access web mail.
 
You can also use it to email links on web pages using your company's webmail.
 
please note that your's company's network configuration can prevent this from working properly. Proper testing is required before deploying to production.

Success or Failure of a Message Recall

The success or failure of a recall depends on the recipients' settings in Microsoft Office Outlook. The following four scenarios explain what happens in various situations, and an additional scenario describes the recall of a message sent to a Microsoft Exchange public folder.

Action
Result
You send an e-mail message to someone. You recall the original message and replace it with a new one.
On the recipient's computer, underTracking Options, the Process requests and responses on arrival check box is selected.
(To view this setting, on the Toolsmenu, click Options, click E-mail Options, and then click Tracking Options.)
Both the original message and the recall message are received in the recipient's Inbox.
Assuming the original message has not been read, the original message is deleted and the recipient is informed that you, the sender, deleted the message from his or her mailbox.
 NOTE   If the original message is marked as read (viewing in the Reading Pane is not reading in this scenario) when the recall message is processed, the recipient is informed that you, the sender, want to delete the message, but the message remains in the recipient's Outlook folder.
You send an e-mail message to someone. You recall the original message and replace it with a new one.
On the recipient's computer, underTracking Options, the Process requests and responses on arrival check box is not selected.
(To view this setting, on the Toolsmenu, click Options, click E-mail Options, and then click Tracking Options.)
Both the original message and the recall message are received in the recipient's Inbox.
On the recipient's computer, one of the following occurs:
*  If the recipient opens the recall message first, the original message is deleted, and the recipient is informed that you, the sender, have deleted the message from their mailbox.
*  If the recipient opens the original message first, the recall fails, and both the original and recall messages are available.
 NOTE   If the original message is marked as read (viewing in the Reading Pane is not reading in this scenario) when the recall message is processed, the recipient is informed that you, the sender, want to delete the message, but the message remains in the recipient's Outlook folder.
You send an e-mail message to someone. You recall the original message and replace it with a new one.
On the recipient's computer, either by rule or by action of the recipient, the original message is moved to another folder and the recall message remains in the Inbox (or it is moved to another folder as well).
As long as the recall message and the original message exist in separate folders, the recipient receives a message indicating that a recall attempt failed. This occurs regardless of the Outlook configurations and the read status of the message.
The original message and the new message are both available to the recipient.
 NOTE   If the recipient read the original message and then marks it as unread, Outlook treats it as if it had never been read and recalls it successfully.
You send an e-mail message to someone. You recall the original message and replace it with a new one.
On the recipient's computer, either by rule or by action of the recipient, both messages are moved to the same folder. This results in behavior similar to that which occurs when Outlook is not configured to automatically process messages.
On the recipient's computer, one of the following occurs:
*  If the recipient opens the recall message first, the original message is deleted, and the recipient is informed that you, the sender, deleted the message from his or her mailbox.
*  If the recipient opens the original message first, the recall fails, and both the old and new messages are available.
 NOTE   If the recipient read the original message and then marked it as unread, Outlook treats it as if it had never been read and recalls it successfully.
You send an e-mail message to a public folder. You recall the original message and replace it with a new one.
One of the following occurs:
*  If the recipient who reads the recall message has read access to all the items in the public folder but did not read the original message, the recall succeeds, and only the new message remains. You, the sender, receive a message indicating that the recall succeeded.
*  If the recipient has already marked the original message as read, he or she is informed that the recall failed, and only the recall message is deleted.
If a user with any other public folder rights opens the recall message, the recall fails, and the user receives a message indicating that the recall failed. Both the old and new messages remain in the public folder.
  NOTES  
*  If the recipient reads the original message and then marks it as unread, Outlook treats it as if it had never been read and recalls it successfully.
*  In the public folder, it is the reader's rights, not the sender's, that determine the success or failure of the recall.

Thursday, April 9, 2009

Understanding re-design of Cluster Service Account in Win2008

In windows server 2003, the cluster required the use of a Cluster Service Account (CSA).  The cluster service as well as resources used this regular domain user account to login.  The CSA presented some problems, the most obvious of which was requiring administrators to rotate this password every so often.
In Windows Server 2008, this requirement was removed.  To replace the CSA, Microsoft created the Cluster Name Object (CNO).  This is a Network Name resource that acts as the identity of the Cluster.  This CNO in turn owns all of the Virtual Computer Objects (VCO) in the cluster.  The VCOs are the computer names to which clients connect.  The cluster service and cluster resources, now impersonate the CNO or the proper VCO.
To give an example, suppose you created a cluster named "BAYEXCH1" and this cluster hosts two applications, named "baysrv1" and "baysrv2."  Active Directory will contain three computer objects - BAYEXCH1, baysrv1, and baysrv2.  BAYEXCH1 will be the owner of baysrv1 and baysrv2.
For more information about Active Directory with Failover Clustering, check out our TechNet guide on Configuring Accounts for Active Directory:  http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc731002.aspx.

Understanding re-design of Cluster Service Account in Win2008

In windows server 2003, the cluster required the use of a Cluster Service Account (CSA).  The cluster service as well as resources used this regular domain user account to login.  The CSA presented some problems, the most obvious of which was requiring administrators to rotate this password every so often.
In Windows Server 2008, this requirement was removed.  To replace the CSA, Microsoft created the Cluster Name Object (CNO).  This is a Network Name resource that acts as the identity of the Cluster.  This CNO in turn owns all of the Virtual Computer Objects (VCO) in the cluster.  The VCOs are the computer names to which clients connect.  The cluster service and cluster resources, now impersonate the CNO or the proper VCO.
To give an example, suppose you created a cluster named "BAYEXCH1" and this cluster hosts two applications, named "baysrv1" and "baysrv2."  Active Directory will contain three computer objects - BAYEXCH1, baysrv1, and baysrv2.  BAYEXCH1 will be the owner of baysrv1 and baysrv2.
For more information about Active Directory with Failover Clustering, check out our TechNet guide on Configuring Accounts for Active Directory:  http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc731002.aspx.
 

Delay the delivery of a single email message in Outlook

Delaying the sending of an email message
If you would like to delay the delivery of an email message within Outlook 2007 follow the steps below:
1.     When you are creating your message, click on the Options tab
2.     In the More Options group, click Delay Delivery .
3.     Click Message Options
4.     Under Delivery options, select the Do not deliver before check box, and then click the delivery date and time that you want.
5.     Click Close
After you click Send, the message will move and remain to the Outbox folder until the delivery time.
Note: If you are using a POP3 account, Outlook must remain open until the message is sent.

Wednesday, April 1, 2009

How to control OWA web beacon filtering for IE8 users

How to Control Web Beacon and HTML Form Filtering for Outlook Web Access
 
 Web beacon is a file object, such as a transparent graphic or an image that is put on a Web site or in an e-mail message.
 
 Web beacons are typically used together with HTML cookies to monitor user behavior on a Web site or to validate a recipient's e-mail address when an e-mail message that contains a Web beacon is opened.
 
 Web beacons and HTML forms can also contain harmful code and can be used to circumvent e-mail filters.
 
 
 
refer to this article: